Write for us

If you’d like to write an editorial piece for Everyday Society, we’d love to hear from you.  We particularly encourage research focused articles that apply a sociological lens to topical issues, however, we are also keen to hear about research contained within your new/forthcoming publications.

We’re keen to bring sociological insights to the wider population, as well as academia, and we’d encourage you to keep this in mind whilst writing.  As a rule, we do not publish response pieces.  If you’d like to reply to an article, you can post it in the comments section – see comments policy.

There is no formal reviewing process, but all articles are considered for suitability for an editorial piece (e.g. it may be suggested that long articles are published as a series) and given a light copy edit, if needed.

How to submit

Please submit editorial pieces of no more than 1,000 words to Donna Willis.  Your submission should include:

  • a short, snappy title;
  • a photo of the author (if possible);
  • author twitter handle/s, and;
  • author attribution details, including any co-authors – please feel free to include a link to your webpage.

You may like to consider providing an accompanying image to include in the piece, permission to reuse the image must be authorised and a copyright line must be provided for attribution.

Circulation

We tweet all editorial pieces (tagging authors where applicable) to our 19,000 twitter followers, multiple times to ensure maximum readership.  Our tweets are also retweeted by our followers on a regular basis, further extending the reach.

As well as twitter, we may included your piece in the BSA’s monthly newsletter which contains a roundup of the month’s news.

Why write for the BSA?

Not only does writing for the BSA connect you with your peers, it encourages collaboration and discussion about your research and it also opens the window of opportunity into policymakers, and the wider population.

Please note: the views and opinions expressed in editorial pieces on Everyday Society are those of the author and not those of the British Sociological Association (BSA).